OMG A NEW POST

Hey everyone! Very long time, no posts! This will hopefully be the beginning of a revival of my blog, since I will probably have more time after finishing high school and starting college. Where am I going? Michigan Tech! Yes, that place in Michigan that’s pretty much as far as you can go before you hit Canada and where summer is about a week long. As you can probably guess, I’m studying electrical engineering. I really like it there and have met some great people that share my obsession for electronics.

Updates. The quadcopter is not done :/. It probably won’t get done either. I was quite close to getting it flying, but it would just sit on the ground and spin in circles. I built another(!) LED cube, this time with blue LEDs. I made a nice set of circuit boards for driving it, with the circuit still copied from the Instructable I followed for the first one.

LED Cube Control Boards
LED Cube Control Boards

Running the test program to verify everything is good.

LED Cube Testing

A (not very good) picture of the cube running the main program.

LED Cube

Well that’s all I have at the moment. I’m working on a big LED installation for our dorm room next semester. All I’ll say right now is it involves ethernet, a teensy 3.1, and 12 meters of Adafruit Neopixel LED strip.

tinyCopter is ALIVE! (sorta)

Progress! This is exciting. After struggling with a pesky compiler issue, I managed to get an LED blinking on my tinyCopter control board. Yes, I managed to get a 32MHz microcontroller with 256K of flash and 16K of RAM to blink an LED. Good use of resources there folks.

Anyway, the issue that I have been having – and it is still there, trust me – is in the creation of a custom board definition for Xmegaduino for my specific setup. Xmegaduino comes with a couple of options for boards, but all of them use the xmega A1. I have a xmega A3. I didn’t think that there would be any issues because the devices in the A series all have the same basic peripherals, just different pin-counts. The problem, however would soon show up.

I got the board definition finished and just copied the pins_arduino header file from a Sparkfun variant just to see if my variant would compile. Cue the obscure compile error! I looked at the error and it said ‘TCF1’ undeclared. What?! The blink sketch I tried compiled just fine for the Sparkfun board, why won’t it work for mine?!  I went back and took a look at the only thing that I changed in my board defintion from the Sparkfun one. It was the MCU type, obviously. I had changed it to atxmega256a3, because that is the device that I am using. When I changed it back to atxmega128a1, which is what the Sparkfun board has, the code compiled perfectly. Then I went digging through the avrdude header files for various devices and found the one for my xmega a3. I searched ‘TCF1’ and it was RIGHT THERE! I don’t know what the issue is, so if anyone else does, please let me know.

You probably read that and though that I never got anything to work. The issue is still there,  so what I did was set the board in Xmegaduino to the Sparkfun one, found the compiled .hex file, and burned it to my chip using AVR Studio. It’s a pain in the butt, but if I can’t get the ‘TCF1’ undeclared issue sorted out, this will have to do.

The point of this post is to say that now I can work on the code for my quadcopter.

qwertyboy now on github!

This is fairly big news. From now on, I will be using github for posting and maintaining my project files. I already have a repository for the tinyCopter and Digital PSU projects, and will  continue to add more. I have several projects going up there way before I do a write ups for them here, so don’t panic if you see stuff there that I have never talked about here.

Check out my github page here!

New Website, New Projects

Well, this is new. Yes, this is a complete re-design and upgrade. My old site, which is hosted at Webs.com, is still live, and will be for a while. It has become too…uh…bad. It is slow and messy, and the editor sucks. I also want to venture into the kit business. Let’s be honest, not even I would buy something from a site that looked like that. I’ve already got some ideas for kits, and am really looking forward to offering them for sale. Some of them will not be for beginners, as they deal with generous amounts of surface-mount soldering. Some of them will be more simple, and will be able to be enjoyed by both beginners and the seasoned hobbyists.

Thanks, and I look forward to what this site has to bring.

~nathan / qwertyboy~